A B C D E


F G H I J


K L M N O


P Q R S T


U V W X Y Z


Abbreviations


Phonetic Alphabet

 

 

Glossary - E

Echelon - a subdivision of a unit, not to be confused with sub-units. Canadian Army units in the 20th Century were usually divided into several echelons for administrative purposes. As an example, an Infantry Battalion in the Second World War was divided as follows:

"F" (for "fighting") Echelon consisted of the rifle companies and support companies, and were located in the front line. As well, fighting transport and supplies, along with battalion headquarters, were considered part of "F" Echelon.

"A" Echelon was located three to five miles behind "F" echelon and held quartermaster stores, repair equipment, spare transport and supplies, the rear battalion HQ (where records were kept; the paymaster was also located here). "A" echelon was under brigade control.

"B" Echelon, under divisional control, held the Headquarters Company headquarters, dental staff, personnel Left Out of Battle, and was where kit was stored.


Emblazonment: Battle Honours selected to be displayed on regimental colours, guidons, standards, etc. are said to be "emblazoned." The display of battle honours has been subject to several guidelines:

  • Battle honours are emblazoned in the sequence prescribed by military, which is in the order in which they were awarded, as well as heraldic custom.

  • Precedence is given to the front on top of a display, and to the right-of-the-line (left as seen by an observer facing the display).

  • When a battle honour list is displayed on both sides of a central device for a balanced effect, the honours are placed in two columns in their order of precedence, commencing at the top left as seen from the front and alternating from the left to right downwards.

  • If the number of honours is sufficient, they may be displayed in four, rather than two columns, the order of precedence being across each of the four columns, commencing at the top left as seen from the front.

  • When there are an odd number of honours to be shown, the last honour is placed in the centre below any central device or motto scroll.

  • Where two honours have simultaneous chronology, theatre or primary honours are listed before subsidiary ones within the theatre.

  • Though type-face varies in some written records to indicate the type of battle honour for historical purposes, all honours are considered equal in recognition. Therefore, they are all emblazoned equally in capital letters on Colours, honour boards and regimental appointments. Regiments are restricted on the number of honours they may emblazon on their Colours. These restrictions were put in place as a result of available space on the various types of Colours or as a result of the large number of awards allocated during the World Wars.1


Environment - in the mid-1980s, when a return to distinctive uniforms for the three services was instituted, the new services were then referred to as environments. They were designated:

  • Sea

  • Land

  • Air

The new Distinctive Environment Uniform (DEU) replaced the former CF Uniform as the dress uniform of the Canadian Forces. The new environments were also colloquially referred to as "Navy", "Army" and "Air Force" and those designations began to appear slowly in some publications and references.

 


Notes

  1. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/defence/caf/military-identity-system/heritage-manual/chapter-3/section-2.html

 
 

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