A B C D E


F G H I J


K L M N O


P Q R S T


U V W X Y Z


Abbreviations


Phonetic Alphabet

 

 

Glossary - H

Hat - A hat is a form of headcovering with a full brim (as distinct from a "cap" which is distinguished by a partial brim ).


Hill refers to a terrain feature higher than surrounding terrain. In military terminology, hills have often been referred to also as "high ground" or "high features". They have been important tactically throughout the 20th Century because they offer a military force an enhanced view of surrounding terrain as well as the ability to employ direct fire weapons with a greater field of fire.

Hills, like many terrain features, were often given names, particularly in Operations Orders in order to prevent confusion. On topographic maps, hills are often named for their elevation (in metres), calculated by measuring the highest point on the hill and giving its elevation above sea level. Hill 70 is an example of a notable battle fought over a hill. Sometimes hills receive more distinctive names; the most famous example would be Vimy Ridge.

Topography

The term military crest refers to the shoulder of a hill or ridge rather than its topographic or actual crest (highest point). It refers to the highest contour of elevation from which the base of its slope can be seen without defilade (being hidden from both view and direct fire). Defensive forces usually located themselves on the military crest, giving them the ability to see approaching attacking forces while still allowing for a withdrawal uphill under pressure if necessary.

The reverse slope is the side of a hill, ridge, or mountain that descends away from the enemy. A reverse slope defence is a positioning technique taking advantage of the concealment afforded by such an obstacle, preventing observation and direct fire. Such a defence also shortens engagement ranges by direct fire weapons used in an assault on such a position.


Hull Down:

In armoured warfare, the term hull-down refers to a position taken up by an armoured fighting vehicle such that its hull is behind a crest, raised ground or some other obstacle, but its turret or roof-mounted weapon remains exposed, allowing it to observe and fire to its front while protecting the body of the vehicle from enemy observation and fire. A hull-down AFV is also referred to as being in defilade. Turret-down refers to a position in which the vehicle's crew can observe to their front from roof hatches, but the vehicle remains completely hidden to view from the front.



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