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Abbreviations


Phonetic Alphabet

 

 

Glossary - R

Rank refers to a basic grade of military promotion; it was a manner of granting seniority and authority within the Canadian Army. This was also further accomplished by the use of appointments.

History

Within military organizations, the use of ranks has been almost universal, with notable exceptions such as the Chinese People's Liberation Army, the Albanian Army (19701991), and the Soviet Red Army (19181935).

The use of a formalized system of ranks dates back to the Romans, and reforms by the consul Gaius Marius in circa 60 BC.

Modern Ranks

The Canadian Army has always had four basic categories of rank:

  • Commissioned Officers

  • Warrant Officers

  • Non-Commissioned Officers

  • Men (later, Non-Commissioned Members)

These categories are themselves often subdivided in various ways, for example Junior NCOs and Senior NCOs, etc.

Types

  • Substantive Rank: A soldier confirmed in a permanent rank, fully paid and confirmed.

  • Acting Rank: A soldier assumes the pay and allowances appropriate to the acting rank, but may be ordered to revert to a previous substantive rank held. May be lacking in training or experience prerequisites for permanent promotion.

  • Brevet Rank. A soldier assumes a rank but without the pay and allowances appropriate to that rank.

  • Local Rank. A soldier assumes a temporary unpaid rank, usually only for a specific operation or mission.


Reproduction refers to a newly produced item intended to be similar (or identical) to items produced in an earlier era.

  • Cap Badges: indicates a badge struck from a different die from the originals, at a later date, with differences from the original but intended to be similar. This could also indicate a casting of an original badge.

  • Cloth Uniforms, Equipment, Insignia: indicates items made from new materials, possibly using original patterns.

Often shortened to "repro" (or, bizarrely, "repop").


Restrike: a cap badge or other metal insignia that was struck from the same dies at a later date, usually with some differences between it and a "genuine" or wartime badge, such as different metal used or a different fastener.

It appears that British badge manufacturers (who were responsible for the creation of many, many Canadian badges) have sold off old dies to private collectors and citizens, so in theory anyone can take these old dies and make re-strikes. Collectors note that many restrike badges are made with the wrong finish, or even left unfinished. This supposedly explains a number of 51st Soo Regiment cap badges that appeared on the market. Many of the restrike badges were from the original dies of the firm of J.R. Gaunt, who also made buttons for Canadian regiments for several decades. In 2000-2001 several dies were auctioned on ebay, for example, including at least one for a rather scarce Boer War-era Canadian shoulder title.



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