Insignia

Rank & Appointment Insignia

Cap Badges

Crowns

Corps & Services 1939-1945

Mounted Units 1939-1945

Collar Badges

1920-1952

 Metal Shoulder Titles

 Slip-On Shoulder Titles 

Buttons 1939-1945

Formation Patches
C.E.F. Troops  
1st Canadian Army

Canadian Military HQ

1st Canadian Corps

2nd Canadian Corps

Atlantic Command

Pacific Command

1st Canadian Division

2nd Canadian Division

3rd Canadian Division

►4th Canadian Division

►5th Canadian Division

6th Canadian Division

7th Canadian Division

8th Canadian Division

1st Armoured Brigade

2nd Armoured Brigade

3rd Armoured Brigade

Misc. & Foreign 1939-45  
Postwar .

Nationality

Miscellaneous Insignia

Good Conduct Chevrons

Instructors Badges

Tank Badges
Lanyards
NCO Corps Badges
Service Chevrons
Wound Stripes
National Insignia

Special Distinctions

 

Good Conduct Chevrons

Good Conduct Chevrons date from before the First World War, and were worn by soldiers with the rank of Private (including those appointed Lance Corporal (or Lance Bombardier in artillery units and Acting Corporal in Rifle Regiments) so long as the soldier had not been subject to formal discipline.  The badges took the form of standard NCO badges worn inverted.

First World War

The Good Conduct Chevrons were worn on the left sleeve of the Service Dress uniform, with each 1-bar chevron representing four years of service, to a maximum of four.  Regulations stated that wound stripes, if worn, were to be below the Good Conduct Badge.

good1.jpg (9414 bytes)
Good Conduct Badge
(shown with wound stripe)
Photo and artifact courtesy Ed Storey

Second World War

Good Conduct Chevrons remained part of Canadian Army dress regulations after the First World War.  Second World War Dress Regulations stated that the badges were to be worn by soldiers below the rank of Corporal (or Bombardier in the artillery), inverted on the left sleeve with the point of the lowest chevron 6 1/2 inches from the end of the cuff (this was later changed to 7 inches).   The badges were made of standard NCO's lace, with soldiers in Rifle Regiments wearing black insignia in the same manner as NCO insignia.

Any soldier serving in the CASF (with prewar Permanent Force service also counting) was entitled to the following badges:

gcone.gif (1658 bytes) 2  years service. gcfour.gif (2841 bytes) 18 years service

(If, after 14 years a soldier had not had his name entered in the Regimental Conduct Book, this requirement was dropped to 16 instead).

gctwo.gif (2077 bytes) 5 years service gcfive.gif (3220 bytes) 23 years service

(If, after 14 years a soldier had not had his name entered in the Regimental Conduct Book, this requirement was dropped to 21 instead).

gcthree.gif (2480 bytes) 12 years service gcsix.gif (3573 bytes) 28 years service

(If, after 14 years a soldier had not had his name entered in the Regimental Conduct Book, this requirement was dropped to 26 instead).

The badges were worn on Service Dress Jackets, Khaki Drill Jackets, and Battle Dress Blouses.

Good Conduct Badges fell from disuse after the disappearance of Battle Dress.


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