Organization

Canadian Army

Domestic Military Organization

Headquarters

Militia HQ

Canadian Forces HQ

National Defence HQ (NDHQ)

Political Institutions

Dept. of Militia & Defence

►►Minister of Militia & Defence

►►Militia Council

Department of National Defence

►►Minister of National Defence

►►Chiefs of Staff Committee

Reorganizations

1902-1904 Dundonald Reforms
1920 Otter Committee
1936 Reorganization
1954 Kennedy Board
1957 Anderson Report
1964 Suttie Commission
1968 Unification
1995 Special Commission

Organizational Corps/Branches

1900-1968 Organizational Corps
1968-2000 Branches

Field Forces

1914-1919  

Canadian Expeditionary Force
CEF Regional Affiliations

Territorial Reinforcement Regts.

1919

Canadian Siberian Exped Force

1939-1940 (1945) 

Canadian Active Service Force

1945

Canadian Army Pacific Force

1950-1953

Canadian Army Special Force

Field Force Formations

1914-1918  
Canadian Corps
1st Div | 2nd Div | 3rd Div | 4th Div 5th Div
1939-1945

1st Canadian Army

1st Canadian Corps

2nd Canadian Corps

Atlantic Command

Pacific Command
1st Infantry Division
2nd Infantry Division

3rd Infantry Division

4th (Armoured) Division
5th (Armoured) Division
6th Division 

7th Division 

8th Division 
1st Armoured Brigade
2nd Armoured Brigade
3rd Armoured Brigade
3rd Tank Brigade

 1950-1953
1 Com Div | 25 Inf Bde

Foreign Headquarters

Allied Forces HQ (AFHQ)

►►15th Army Group

►►►8th Army

SHAEF

►►21st Army Group

►►►2nd British Army

Special Forces

1st Canadian Para Battalion

First Special Service Force

Pacific Coast Militia Rangers

Canadian Rangers

Special Air Service (SAS) Coy

The Canadian Airborne Regt

Organizational Formations

Reserve Bdes - 1941-1945

13 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

14 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

27th Canadian Brigade

1 CMBG

2 CMBG

3 CMBG

4 CMBG

5 CMBG

1st Cdn Division (1954-1958)

1st Cdn Division (1988-2000)

Special Service Force

Auxiliary Services
Alliances

1914-1918 Triple Alliance
1939-1945 Allies
1949-1999 NATO

Veteran's Organizations

Defence Associations

Canadian Cavalry Association
Canadian Infantry Association
Intelligence Branch Association

National Defence Emp Assoc
RCAC (Cavalry)
RCA Association
RCOC Association
Union of Nat Def Employees

Veteran's Associations

ANAVETS
Royal Canadian Legion

Supplementary Order of Battle

Unit Listings by year

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1910 | 1911 | 1912 | 1913 | 1914
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1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984
1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989
1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994
1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999

Unit Listings by Corps/Branch

Armoured Units 1940-1945

Cdn Dental Corps 1939-1945
Cdn Intelligence Corps 1942-45

Cdn Provost Corps 1940-1945

Infantry Battalions 1939-1945

RCOC 1939-1945

Canadian Corps

Canadian Corps refers to two operational corps formed in Canadian history. This article refers to the formation of that name formed in the First World War. For information on the Canadian Corps in the Second World War, see I Canadian Corps.

Canadian Corps in The First World War

The Canadian Corps was formed as an operational corps in France and Flanders, after the arrival of the 2nd Canadian Division in France in Sep 1915.

Canada had originally envisioned contributing national "contingents" and had not planned on the unprecedented act of forming a formation of Canadian units. The Minister of Militia and Defence, however, insisted that Canadian troops remain under national command and as one entity. Once two divisions had been formed, with other divisions in the process of being formed, the creation of a corps headquarters to administer and command them was a natural. The Minister's representative in London wrote on 1 Apr 1915 suggesting that a corps be formed. Historian David Love notes that this is the first known mention in the historical record of the creation of a corps.1 At this point, the 1st Division had not yet seen major combat and the 2nd Division was not in Europe yet. The Imperial Army Council in Britain, however, had also concluded that a Canadian Corps would be appropriate, suggesting as much on 15 Jun 1915 to the Canadian government. The Canadian Corps became a reality on 13 Sep 1915.

The corps was small by British standards, which had a minimum of three divisions under command, at least initially. The Canadian Corps was expanded by the addition of the 3rd Canadian Division in Dec 1915 and the 4th Canadian Division in Aug 1916. In Feb 1917 the organization of a 5th Canadian Division in the UK began but was broken up a year later before it was fully formed, and used to reinforce the four divisions on the Continent. Even so, with four divisions, the Canadian Corps was larger than British corps by 1918, especially since manpower shortages led the British to reduce the strength of each infantry brigade from four battalions to three, while Canadian brigades remained at full four-battalion strength until the end of the war.

Due to Canada's insistence that Canadian soldiers fight together, the Canadian Corps was unique in that its composition remained constant throughout the war, unlike British corps in which divisions were shuffled often.

Commanders

The Canadian Corps was originally commanded by British Lieutenant General E.A.H. Alderson until 1916 when another British Lieutenant General Julian Byng took over. When Byng was promoted to an Army command during the summer of 1917, he was succeeded by the Canadian commander of the 1st Canadian Division, General Arthur W. Currie.

General Officer Commanding
  • Lieutenant General Sir E.A.H. Alderson, KCB
13 Sep 1915 - 28 May 1916
  • Lieutenant General Hon. Sir Julian Byng, KCB, KCMG, MVO
29 May 1916- 8 Jun 1917
  • Lieutenant General Sir A.W. Currie, GCMG, KCB
9 Jun 1917 - 8 Aug 1919

The Canadian Corps was generally regarded as well trained and motivated, especially after the capture of Vimy Ridge.

The Canadian Expeditionary Force as a whole suffered 60,661 killed during the war, or 9.28% of the 619,636 who enlisted.

Notes

  1. Love, David W. A Call To Arms: The Organization and Administration of Canada's Military in World War One. (Bunker to Bunker Books, Winnipeg, 1999.) ISBN 1894255038. p.107


Lieutenant General Sir E.A.H. Alderson (Public Archives of Canada
photo C-049485)


Brigadier General A.G.L. McNaughton, Commander of Canadian Corps Heavy Artillery in 1918.
 (Public Archives of Canada
photo PA-034150)


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