Organization

Canadian Army

Domestic Military Organization

Headquarters

Militia HQ

Canadian Forces HQ

National Defence HQ (NDHQ)

Political Institutions

Dept. of Militia & Defence

►►Minister of Militia & Defence

►►Militia Council

Department of National Defence

►►Minister of National Defence

►►Chiefs of Staff Committee

Reorganizations

1902-1904 Dundonald Reforms
1920 Otter Committee
1936 Reorganization
1954 Kennedy Board
1957 Anderson Report
1964 Suttie Commission
1968 Unification
1995 Special Commission

Organizational Corps/Branches

1900-1968 Organizational Corps
1968-2000 Branches

Field Forces

1914-1919  

Canadian Expeditionary Force
CEF Regional Affiliations

Territorial Reinforcement Regts.

1919

Canadian Siberian Exped Force

1939-1940 (1945) 

Canadian Active Service Force

1945

Canadian Army Pacific Force

1950-1953

Canadian Army Special Force

Field Force Formations

1914-1918  
Canadian Corps
1st Div | 2nd Div | 3rd Div | 4th Div 5th Div
1939-1945

1st Canadian Army

1st Canadian Corps

2nd Canadian Corps

Atlantic Command

Pacific Command
1st Infantry Division
2nd Infantry Division

3rd Infantry Division

4th (Armoured) Division
5th (Armoured) Division
6th Division 

7th Division 

8th Division 
1st Armoured Brigade
2nd Armoured Brigade
3rd Armoured Brigade
3rd Tank Brigade

 1950-1953
1 Com Div | 25 Inf Bde

Foreign Headquarters

Allied Forces HQ (AFHQ)

►►15th Army Group

►►►8th Army

SHAEF

►►21st Army Group

►►►2nd British Army

Special Forces

1st Canadian Para Battalion

First Special Service Force

Pacific Coast Militia Rangers

Canadian Rangers

Special Air Service (SAS) Coy

The Canadian Airborne Regt

Organizational Formations

Reserve Bdes - 1941-1945

13 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

14 Cdn Infantry Training Bde

27th Canadian Brigade

1 CMBG

2 CMBG

3 CMBG

4 CMBG

5 CMBG

1st Cdn Division (1954-1958)

1st Cdn Division (1988-2000)

Special Service Force

Auxiliary Services
Alliances

1914-1918 Triple Alliance
1939-1945 Allies
1949-1999 NATO

Veteran's Organizations

Defence Associations

Canadian Cavalry Association
Canadian Infantry Association
Intelligence Branch Association

National Defence Emp Assoc
RCAC (Cavalry)
RCA Association
RCOC Association
Union of Nat Def Employees

Veteran's Associations

ANAVETS
Royal Canadian Legion

Supplementary Order of Battle

Unit Listings by year

1900 | 1901 | 1902 | 1903 | 1904
1905 | 1906 | 1907 | 1908 | 1909
1910 | 1911 | 1912 | 1913 | 1914
1915 | 1916 | 1917 | 1918 | 1919
1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923 | 1924
1925 | 1926 | 1927 | 1928 | 1929
1930 | 1931 | 1932 | 1933 | 1934
1935 | 1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939
1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944
1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949
1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953 | 1954
1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959
1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963 | 1964
1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969
1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973 | 1974
1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979
1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984
1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989
1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994
1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999

Unit Listings by Corps/Branch

Armoured Units 1940-1945

Cdn Dental Corps 1939-1945
Cdn Intelligence Corps 1942-45

Cdn Provost Corps 1940-1945

Infantry Battalions 1939-1945

RCOC 1939-1945

 

Canadian Forces Headquarters (CFHQ)

Canadian Forces Headquarters was the unified headquarters set up in the wake of Unification to oversee the newly integrated armed forces. After several problems were identified in the new structure, a review of the Department of National Defence resulted in a new structure being set up in 1972 which merged both civilian staff under the Deputy Minister of Defence and military staff of the Chief of the Defence Staff into one National Defence Headquarters.

From Air University Review July-August 1967

Reorganization of the Canadian Armed Forces

by Air Marshal F. R. Sharp, RCAF

In July 1964 Parliament approved a bill which amended the National Defence Act and provided for the appointment of a single Chief of Defence Staff to replace the Chairman of the Chiefs of Staff, the Chief of the Naval Staff, the Chief of the General Staff, and the Chief of the Air Staff. Thus, one man became responsible to the Minister of National Defence for the administration and employment of the 120,000 men and women who were serving at that time in Canada’s regular forces. This was a fundamental and essential step towards integration. It made possible the reorganization of the Naval Headquarters, Army Headquarters, and Air Force Headquarters into a single Canadian Forces Headquarters, with four functional branches, each headed by a lieutenant-general or an officer of equivalent rank. These branches, with some readjustments and changes in designation over the last two years, have become

  • the Branch of the Vice Chief of Defence Staff, who is primarily responsible for military operations, plans and operational readiness, and, in conjunction with the Deputy Minister, the development of the Integrated Defence Program

  • the Personnel Branch, headed by the Chief of Personnel, who formulates personnel policy, including medical, dental, and chaplain services

  • the Technical Services Branch, whose Chief is responsible for all engineering and development programs and plans and policies for the procurement of materiel and maintenance

  • the Comptroller General Branch, which is responsible for three main fields: administration, financial, and manpower control and management.

The elimination of the three chiefs of staff and the appointment of a single Chief of Defence Staff with executive authority over the three services was a fundamental departure from the traditional military organization in most Western countries, and it drew some criticism. The main objection was that it placed too much power in the hands of one man or, alternatively, that the responsibilities would be so great as to overwhelm him. In practice, neither criticism has been shown to have any validity, and today there are few critics of the single chief concept.

Canadian Forces Headquarters was replaced by a National Defence Headquarters which integrated civilian and military staff in one organization.

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