Weapons of War Series

The Weapons of War series by Service Publications provides a detailed look at Canadian military equipment, with in-depth look at development, deployment, organization of units, and more, including equipment manufactured domestically as well as foreign manufactured equipment used in action overseas. The focus of the series has been primarily vehicles but the publisher has stated it will branch out to include weapons, communications gear, and more, and to date a number of interesting titles including diverse subjects such as artillery, trains, and bridges have appeared in addition to books on soft-skin vehicles, AFVs, scout cars and more.

The format of the series is attractive - affordable, in a handy format (24 pages, soft cover, 6-3/4" x 10"), and with full colour cover photos (either wartime, or of surviving examples in collections), plenty of illustrations between the covers, and scale drawings by renowned AFV artists making for very nice centrepieces.  All photos are credited, and each volume has a good bibliography.

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The Ram: Development and Variants (Volume I)  concentrates on Canadian-manufactured tanks.  Used as a training tank in the Second World War, the Ram is perhaps most famous for its role as part of the 1st Canadian Armoured Personnel Carrier regiment.  The many variants are described, a scale drawing by Chris Johnson forms the centrepiece, and technical details are given in useful tables.

Paul Roberts is a mechanical engineer who has published a book on the Valentine tank as well as The Ram: Development and Variants (Volume II).

(ISBN 189458113X Aug 2002)

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The Sherman in Canadian Service, by Steve Guthrie, provides a useful look at the employment of this vehicle in Europe.   Like the Ram volume, a table of variants is provided in the back and a variety of topics are discussed, describing various practices adopted by Canadian tank crews as a result of combat experience.  A list of Canadian units that used the Sherman is provided, including brief notes on their service.

Steve Guthrie is a journalist and Second World War military history enthusiast, who for many years produced the Milifax newsletter and at the time of the publication of this book host of the Milifax website.

(ISBN 1894581148, Nov 2002)

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The Halftrack was used primarily in Canadian armoured divisions in WW II, but were also found in the regular divisions overseas as well.  Bill Inglee explores the history of usage by the Canadian Army in the Second World War, and again in Korea, and studies the various models in service.   Four different Chris Johnson drawings grace the centrepiece of this volume, and statistical and technical data are included also.

Bill Inglee is a journalist and military historian with an interest in Canadian military vehicles.

(ISBN 1894581172, Jul 2003)

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The 6-Pounder anti-tank gun was the infantry battalion commander's personal artillery.  The book covers not only infantry usage but also a brief discussion of naval and even air force usage.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 1894581180, Aug 2003)

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The Ram: Development and Variants (Volume II)  discusses employment of the Ram in Canadian armoured regiments, as well as the Kangaroo variant (an Armoured Personnel Carrier utilizing the Ram chassis), the Badger (a flame throwing Kangaroo variant), Command/Observation Posts, and a brief look at the Sexton self-propelled 25-pounder.  Many previously unpublished photos from the public archives complement the text, as does a Chris Johnston scale drawing of a Ram II.

Paul Roberts is a mechanical engineer who has published a book on the Valentine tank as well as The Ram: Development and Variants (Volume II).

(ISBN 1894581199, Nov 2004)

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The 25-Pounder howitzer was one of the best guns of its type in the world, and helped the Commonwealth Armies build a world class artillery system which the First Canadian Army in Europe depended on for victory in the Second World War.  The book covers technical aspects of the design and employment of this weapon.  Well illustrated with wartime photos, supported by current sketches.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 1894581245, Nov 2004)

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The Land Mattress was Canada's answer to the terrifying German Nebelwerfer or Russian Katyusha that is still in use today, the forerunner of the MLRS in the United States.  The book is divided logically into several sections, covering the early days of rocket weaponry in the British and Canadian Armies, a discussion of the roles of guns vs. rocket artillery, the development of the Land Mattress in particular, the production of the weapon, the trials in the field, and the combat employment of the weapon, as well as an epilogue describing RCEME support to the artillerymen using this equipment.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 1894581261, Mar 2005)

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Armoured Trains were used in British Columbia when the threat of Japanese invasion was seen as imminent and real. Utilizing rare archival sources, Lucy presents maps showing the employment of these vehicles, as well as discussions of technical data, armament, and armour and communications equipment.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN 1894581253, Mar 2005)

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The Kangaroo in Canadian Service looks at the world's first fully tracked and purpose built armoured personnel carrier, the brainchild of Canadian Lieutenant General Guy Simonds in the summer of 1944.  The genesis of this vehicle is well described, and both the Priest and Ram models are discussed.  A brief history of the 1st APC Regiment is given, and other extras, aside from the scale line drawing in the centrepiece, include a table of regimental lift capabilities as well as a War Establishment for the regiment showing the numbers and types of vehicles.

Mark W. Tonner is a retired member of the Royal Canadian Regiment and scholar of Second World War History.

(ISBN 1-894581-30-X Aug 2005)

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1935 Armoured Car in Canadian Service looks at the chaotic world of the inter-war Canadian military, discussing government policy and equipment needs, focussing on just two vehicles by Ford and Chevrolet.   The text is complemented by rare period photos, and of course the usual superb line drawings in the centrepiece by Chris Johnson.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN 1894581288, Aug 2005)

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The Centurion in Canadian Service focuses on Canada's Main Battle Tank from the 1950s up until the acquisition of the Leopard in the 1970s.  The text examines the history of the vehicle in Canadian service, upgrades and service modifications to the various Marks, a brief description of disposal of the vehicles in the 1970s, and a section on paint colours and markings.   Photos are all black and white, and support the text.  Centrepiece consists of line drawings by George Bradford, a well-known name in armour modelling.

Don Dingwall is a museum technician, professional model builder and writer specializing in Canadian military subjects; his online forum at the time this book was released was located at http://www.network54.com/Forum/169232

(ISBN 1-894581-20-2, Aug 2005)

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The Skink in Canadian Service examines Canada's self-propelled, full-tracked, fully-armoured anti-aircraft gun project of the Second World War.   The text is complemented by rare period photos, and line drawings in the centrepiece by famed AFV artist George Bradford.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN 1-894581-29-6, Dec 2005)
 

The Leopard in Canadian Service gives a brief summary of the Canada's main battle tank from the Trudeau era into the 21st Century, accompanied by contemporary photos and a centrepiece of line drawings by noted AFV artist George R. Bradford.

Michael R. McNorgan served for 39 years in both the Regular Force and the Reserve Force of the Canadian Armed Forces as a member of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps. Among his list of several published works are included a regimental history of the 1st Hussars in 2004 and a collaboration with John Marteinson on a history of the RCAC in 2000.

(ISBN 1-894581-31-8, Dec 2005)

 

The Sexton SP Gun in Canadian Service traces the history of Canada's answer to the M7 Priest.  The text is complemented by rare contemporary photos, data charts, and a centrepiece of line drawings by famed AFV artist George R. Bradford.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 1-894581-32-6, Dec 2006)

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The Armoured Autocar in Canadian Service examines Canada's armoured cars in the First World War, including detailed notes on their tactical deployments and history, as well as a centrepiece of detailed line drawings by Chris Johnson.

Cameron Pulsifer has a doctorate in history from Queen's University and has enjoyed a long career as an historian on staff with Parks Canada, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, and from 1991 to the time the book was published, the Canadian War Museum.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-38-7, Aug 2007)

 

The Jeep in Canadian Service looks at the history of the "Blitzbuggy" in Canadian service, including development, trailers, colours & markings.

Eric Booth is a military historian and editor of the Ontario Military Vehicle Association (OMVA) magazine, as well as a jeep owner and veteran of The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada, having served 14 years with the Primary Reserve.

(ISBN 978-894581-34-9, Aug 2007)

 
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The Bobcat APC in Canadian Service examines this prototype design as well as the history of armoured personnel carriers in Canadian service, dating back to the First World War. The text is complemented by rare contemporary photos and a centrepiece of line drawings by famed AFV artist George Bradford.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-47-9, Dec 2007)

 

The Staghound in Canadian Service discusses the development and Canadian employment of the T17 armoured car during and after the Second World War. Contemporary photos and a centrepiece of line drawings by famed AFV artist George Bradford complement the text.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-37-0, Dec 2007)

 

M38A1 Jeep in Canadian Service follows the history of Canadian military jeeps into the postwar world, with contemporary photographs and line drawings by Karl Gagnon.

Andrew Iarocci,  earned his doctorate in history from Sir Wilfrid Laurier University. A professor in history, he held a two-year Research Fellowship at the Canadian War Museum, an institution at which he also served as Collections Manager, Transportation and Artillery.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-48-6, Mar 2008)

The 2-pounder Anti-Tank Gun in Canadian Service chronicles the service history of the weapon in its dismounted and vehicle-borne roles. Photos and line drawings of various carriages by Karl Gagnon complement the text.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-36-3, Mar 2008)

Early Armour in Canadian Service is a survey of various types of AFV used from 1917 to 1943. Contemporary photos are augmented by a centrepiece with line drawing silhouettes by Karl Gagnon.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-54-7, Dec 2009)

The 17-pounder Anti-Tank Gun in Canadian Service studies the use of the high-velocity 76mm gun in Canadian service, in the towed and vehicle mounted role on vehicles such as the Archer and the Sherman. Contemporary photos and line drawings of the towed gun by Karl Gagnon complement the text.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-53-0, Dec 2009)

The Ferret Scout Car in Canadian Service follows the story of this unique Commonwealth AFV through its development and Canadian employment. A centrepiece of line drawings by Karl Gagnon augment the suite of contemporary photographs that illustrate the text.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-55-4, Dec 2009)

Colin MacGregor Stevens served as a reservist in The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada in the rank of captain and is well known in military vehicle collecting circles, specializing in Canadian vehicles and their markings.

The 3/4-ton SMP Truck in Canadian Service studies the development and employment of the standard military pattern 3/4 ton truck after the Second World War in its many roles. Line drawings by Karl Gagnon augment a collection of rare contemporary photographs that illustrate the text.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-56-1, Dec 2009)

Andrew Iarocci earned his doctorate in history from Sir Wilfrid Laurier University. A professor in history, he held a two-year Research Fellowship at the Canadian War Museum, an institution at which he also served as Collections Manager, Transportation and Artillery.

 

The Churchill in Canadian Service is a brief survey of the A22 Infantry Tank, better known as the "Churchill", and its employment by the Canadian Army in the Second World War in the UK, in combat in Europe, and in Canada. The book also includes a section on squadron markings and tank names, and a number of vehicle variants are described. The centrepiece is a set of line drawings by Karl Gagnon.

Mark W. Tonner is a retired member of the Royal Canadian Regiment and scholar of Second World War History.

(ISBN 978-894581-67-7, Jul 2010)

Non-Bailey Bridging in Canadian Service examines military bridging of the Second World War era, including Olafson, Folding Boat Equipment, and Pontoon types. The text is supplemented by contemporary photos and a number of sketches in the centrepiece by the author.

John Sliz has authored several books on military engineering in the Second World War, including studies of Canadian engineer units at Arnhem.

(ISBN 978-894581-68-4, Jul 2010)

The Honest John in Canadian Service studies the development and Canadian usage of this surface-to-surface missile system in the 1960s. The book includes a table of technical data, contemporary photos, line drawings of the missile and launch vehicle by Karl Gagnon, and a detailed discussion of the development of the weapon, organization of the units that deployed the weapon, and issues related to access to nuclear warheads.

John Davidson served as an officer in the Canadian Army for 37 years, including service with both 1 and 2 SSM Batteries. Among his qualifications was Instructor-in-Gunnery, the highest artillery qualification possible in the Canadian Army.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-71-4, Dec 2010)

The Machinery Lorry in Canadian Service studies the use of armourer's workshops by Canadian ordnance units, with a look at a number of different vehicle types, with particular focus on the Canadian Military Pattern vehicles of the Second World War. Contemporary photos and a centrepiece of line drawings by Karl Gagnon complete the volume.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-70-1, Dec 2010)

The Otter Recce Car in Canadian Service studies the development of the reconnaissance car and its role in the Second World War, in particular the Otter, one of three Canadian wheeled reconnaissance vehicles developed during the war. Contemporary photos and a centrepiece of line drawings by Karl Gagnon accentuate the text.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN: 978-1-894581-73-8, Oct 2011)

3.7" Heavy AA Gun in Canadian Service studies the employment of anti-aircraft guns in the Canadian Army beginning in the First World War, and then examines the development and employment of the 3.7-inch gun, including a discussion of its ammunition and the history of the only unit to field it overseas, the 2nd Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA. A set of line drawings of a gun by Karl Gagnon accompany the text, along with a suite of contemporary photographs.

Doug Knight is a retired Army officer with an engineering degree and a deep knowledge of technical matters germane to the Royal Canadian Artillery and Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-74-5, Oct 2011)

Pacific Coast Artillery in Canadian Service is an edited compilation drawn primarily from Army Headquarters report #8 from May 1944, with a new collection of selected contemporary photographs and captions.

G.W.L. Nicholson (1902-1980) is well known as one of Canada's official historians, and Director of the Historical Section, Army Headquarters. He commanded the Historical Section of Canadian Military Headquarters in the United Kingdom during the Second World War and penned the Canadian Army's official history of the Italian Campaign following the war. He was the Director of the Historical Section, Army Headquarters in Ottawa from 1959 to his retirement from military service in 1961.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-69-1, Feb 2012)

The C15TA in Canadian Service looks at the development of this Canadian pattern armoured truck during the Second World War. The text is complemented by rare contemporary photos, and a centrepiece of line drawings by Karl Gagnon.

Roger Lucy is well known in the collecting community as "the helmet guy", and in addition to his seminal work on Canadian helmets, Tin Lids, is also researching helmets as used by forces around the world.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-75-2, Feb 2012)

The Bailey Bridge in Canadian Service covers the service history of this ubiquitous engineering equipment, from its introduction in the UK, first combat deployment in Sicily, and its long history throughout Italy and North-West Europe. A brief summary of post-war use is included, and sub-headings include introduction of the equipment, a discussion of design features, production, supply of bridging equipment to units in the field, a discussion of how the bridge was used at the front, detailed exampled of work on two specific bridges, and more. The book is illustrated with contemporary photos from museums and private collections, and the centrepiece is a line drawing of typical Bailey equipment.

John Sliz has authored several books on military engineering in the Second World War, including studies of Canadian engineer units at Arnhem.

(ISBN 978-894581-77-6, Jun 2012)

The Postwar Sherman in Canadian Service

The Sherman tank continued in Canadian service far longer after the Second World War than it laboured during the war itself. The book traces this history in great detail, covering topics such as finance, technical specifications, defence policy, training, and other topics, with emphasis on the Korean War. A number of contemporary photos are included, as is the customary centrepiece, of a Militia Sherman. The four-view drawing is by Karl Gagnon.

Rod Henderson served in The Ontario Regiment (RCAC), achieving the rank of Sergeant, and at the time of publication lives in Oshawa, Ontario. Fascinated by tales of the Sherman told by long-serving members of his regiment, the first-time author set out to share the story that he found so compelling with others.

(ISBN 978-894581-76-9, Jun 2012)

The Heavy Utility in Canadian Service

The Heavy Utility truck was one of several Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) trucks that were ubiquitously used in the Canadian Army overseas during the Second World War, but about which little has been written. This volume has separate sections on development, general description, prototype, ambulance, cipher truck and computor variants, machinery variants, standard personnel and wireless models, and a closing section on employment. The centrepiece shows line drawings illustrating the truck from left, right, front, back, and top, and also illustrates a typical camouflage pattern.

Robert H. Clarke retired from the Canadian Army and works as a consultant, including with the Swords and Ploughshares Museum.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-78-3 Dec 2012)

 

155-mm Howitzers in Canadian Service

The Canadian Army's needs for artillery heavier than the 25-pounder had been met primarily by 4.5in and 5.5in guns. Following the war, changing needs led to the adoption of 155mm weapons and this book explores the development of postwar artillery doctrine and the technical details of a variety of weapons systems, including the M109 self-propelled howitzer, and the M114 and M117 towed howitzers. A section on ammunition is provided, and the volume includes a centrepiece with line drawings by Karl Gagnon.

John Davidson served in field, air defence and surface-to-surface missile artillery units in the Canadian Army, including as battery commander in a unit employing the M109 howitzer. He retired after a 37-year career that included unit, staff and operational postings in Canada and Europe.

(ISBN 978-1-894581-79-0 Dec 2012)

 


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