Weapons

Small Arms

Bayonets | Pistols  | Rifles
Submachine Guns

Thompson Submachine Gun
Sten Gun
C1 Submachine Gun

Light Weapons

Light Machine Guns

Lewis Gun
Bren Gun
C2 LMG
C9 LMG

Machine Guns

Colt Machine Gun
Vickers Gun
C5 General Purpose MG
C6 General Purpose MG
M2 .50 calibre

Light Anti-Tank Weapons

Boys Anti-Tank Rifle
Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank
Bazooka
M72 SRAAW (L)
Carl Gustav
Eryx

Mortars

2-inch Mortar
3-inch Mortar
3-inch Stokes Gun
6-inch Newton Mortar
9.45-inch Newton Mortar
C3 81mm Mortar
M19 60mm Mortar

Ordnance

Anti-Tank Guns

106mm Recoilless Rifle
2-pounder Anti-Tank Gun
6-pounder Anti-Tank Gun
17-pounder Anti-Tank Gun
TOW Missile

Guns

18-pounder Gun
25-pounder Gun
60-pounder Howitzer
C1 105mm Howitzer
C3 105mm Howitzer
LG1 C1 105mm Howitzer

Anti-Aircraft Guns

3.7-inch Gun

Grenades

Hand Grenades
No. 69 Grenade
M61 & M67 Grenade
Rifle Grenades
Grenade Launchers
Anti-Tank Grenades
No. 68 Grenade

Ammunition
Small Arms & Light Weapons

.303 Mk VII
5.56mm
7.62mm NATO
Pistol Ammunition
PIAT Ammunition

Ordnance

106mm Ammunition
Armour Piercing
Armour Piercing Composite Rigid
AP Discarding Sabot
High Explosive Anti-Tank
High Explosive, Squash Head

Terminology

Fixed ammunition
Proximity Fuze

Ordnance

Ordnance covers a wide variety of heavy weapons employed by the Canadian Army for use against personnel, vehicles, aircraft, emplacements and for other purposes. Self-propelled guns are covered in the section on Vehicles.

Howitzers were a type of artillery piece distinguished from other Guns in that they delivered munitions chiefly by indirect fire, firing at high angles over intervening obstacles. Howitzers typically had shorter barrels than other types of artillery. The "gun-howitzer", a field piece capable of firing both directly and indirectly, became common during the Second World War.

The term quick-firing was applied to a gun that fired fixed ammunition, and was also equipped with a recoil mechanism.

With the introduction of the tank in the First World War came the first anti-tank weapons. The threat to Canadian infantry by German armour was very low, and infantry weapons were not developed to combat enemy tanks until the Second World War. By the second half of the century, Light Anti-Tank Weapons, Anti-Tank Guns, Improvised Weapons, Self-Propelled Guns, and Self-Propelled Missile Systems such as TUA (TOW Under Armour) or ADATS had all become highly sophisticated in design.

 


canadiansoldiers.com 1999-present